9/19/15

The Donald Archetype [Part 1]



We met the Hero and he is us.
The Donald Archetype [Part 1]

The Donald is more than a mythological figure, carved out of marble, a descendant of Greek Chaos. The Donald is more than a literary caricature of Everyman. The Donald in his most powerful role is an archetype, a transcendent character commonly present in the unconscious depths of humankind’s psyche. 

In Jungian psychology, inherited from Swiss psychologist Carl Jung, an archetype is a fundamental quality or character of human existence embedded within the “collective unconscious” of all human beings. Examples of archetypes are the Hero, the Villain, the Scapegoat, Good versus Evil, the Innocent Youth, the Mother Figure, the Fall and Redemption.

Humans didn't "invent" archetypes, but they do express archetypes in the conscious world of art, literature, and religion. The Hero or the Villain is not someone or something "out there" in the world; the Hero and the Villain are part of us. To paraphrase Pogo, “We have met the Hero, and he is us.” Likewise, “We have met the Villain and he is us.” [Continue Reading . . . ]



The Donald Archetype [Part 2]

We met the villain and he is us.
The Donald Archetype [Part 2]

It should be obvious that one person’s hero is another person’s villain. Was Elliot Ness the hero or the villain in his take down of Al Capone? It depends if you were a teetotaler in the suburbs of Chicago or a drunk in a Chicago speakeasy. Ness and Capone were each simultaneously a hero and a villain.

And, so it is with The Donald. To The Lost Generation of the hinterland, the forgotten Middle Americans of yore, it is no surprise that the yellow coiffed billionaire in the blue business suit is King Arthur, Robin Hood, Don Quixote, James Bond, Joan of Arc, Beowulf, and General McArthur, all rolled up into one persona. on the other hand The Donald is a villain and the enemy to the small coterie of privileged elite who inhabit the halls of Congress, the upper echelons of executive privilege, the news desks of the Newspeak media, and the family dynasties of political succession, all of whom cling to their claim of their Dieu et mon droit, their Divine Right to Govern. [Continue reading . . .]